Il B737 Max riprende i test

Charter2017

Well-known member
Utente Registrato
3 Agosto 2017
372
105
Alaska Airlines: "mi fido eh, ma forse no".
Alaska will fly the Boeing 737 MAX only after our own assessments, verifications and internal reviews determine that the aircraft is safe throughout our network for our guests and our crews. Teams from divisions all across Alaska are working on the entry into service requirements for the MAX.
“As a safety professional with decades of experience, including many years with the FAA, I’ve had the opportunity to stay very close to the FAA and Boeing through the grounding and recertification of the 737 MAX. I’m very confident with all the steps the FAA and Boeing have taken and the steps we’re taking at Alaska to prepare us to safely bring this aircraft into our fleet.”


 

vipero

Well-known member
Utente Registrato
8 Ottobre 2007
4,731
384
.
Si
Gli aerei vengono assegnati 1/2 giorni prima.
Può capitare addirittura che vengano assegnati 2 ore prima.

Inoltre ci sono anche gli imprevisti, ponendo un esempio, devo volare con un 738, uno dei motori non si accende. L'unico aereo disponibile è un MAX, che si fa? Si prende e si cambia aereo, se un pax non vuole volarci sopra può sempre scendere e addio.
Beh insomma... il planning tiene conto di molte variabili ma una certa determinazione, almeno sulla carta, bisogna rispettarla. Tra scadenze, task, lavori etc... le macchine assegnate si conoscono con discreto anticipo.
Poi che sia meglio prendersi un margine nel comunicare al pubblico per vie delle immancabili modifiche in operativo, credo sia fisiologico.
 

njko98

Well-known member
Utente Registrato
25 Aprile 2016
306
16
Roma
Beh insomma... il planning tiene conto di molte variabili ma una certa determinazione, almeno sulla carta, bisogna rispettarla. Tra scadenze, task, lavori etc... le macchine assegnate si conoscono con discreto anticipo.
Poi che sia meglio prendersi un margine nel comunicare al pubblico per vie delle immancabili modifiche in operativo, credo sia fisiologico.
In linea di massima le conosci con anticipo, ma fidati che da addetto ai lavori mi è capitato spesso di cambiare aereo, fare cambi macchina fuori base, aereo inop etc.

Assicurare ai passeggeri di non volare su un max è impossibile
 

vipero

Well-known member
Utente Registrato
8 Ottobre 2007
4,731
384
.
In linea di massima le conosci con anticipo, ma fidati che da addetto ai lavori mi è capitato spesso di cambiare aereo, fare cambi macchina fuori base, aereo inop etc.

Assicurare ai passeggeri di non volare su un max è impossibile
Fidati pure tu, che so cosa voglia dire ;)

Comunque non é che assicurano ai pax di non volarci, ma di accettare che gli stessi possano rifiutare di volarci senza incorrere in penali.
 

s4lv0z

Well-known member
Utente Registrato
11 Dicembre 2017
374
11
Fidati pure tu, che so cosa voglia dire ;)

Comunque non é che assicurano ai pax di non volarci, ma di accettare che gli stessi possano rifiutare di volarci senza incorrere in penali.
In pratica una "concessione" per evitare che quella frazione (che non saprei quantizzare) di pax che realmente ha delle remore ignori a priori il loro brand per la possibilità teorica di trovarsi sul velivolo in questione.

Concordo con chi resta perplesso da un discorso tanto ambiguo.

Inviato dal mio SM-G975F utilizzando Tapatalk
 

vipero

Well-known member
Utente Registrato
8 Ottobre 2007
4,731
384
.
Fonte: Aeronews

The future of Boeing's #737MAX is in the hands of nearly 700 workers toiling behind the gray doors of a three-bay hangar at a desert airport in Washington state. Inside, over an endless 24-hour loop, 737 MAX planes are rolled in for maintenance, and upgrades of software and systems as mandated by the FAA. Analysts say clearing the logjam of up to 450 stored jets is crucial before Boeing can resume production. The work at Moses Lake is a cornerstone of a global logistical and financial strategy under way at Boeing to clear a backlog of more than 800 mothballed 737 MAX jets. About 450 are Boeing property, and a further 387 were in airline service before the FAA’s grounding order in March 2019.

 

Charter2017

Well-known member
Utente Registrato
3 Agosto 2017
372
105
  • Like
Reactions: 777Aeromexico

Dancrane

Amministratore AC
Staff Forum
10 Febbraio 2008
16,772
307
Milano
Nulla di eclatante, i 320 (entrati dall'acquisizione di Virgin) sono in fase di dismissione, avendo Alaska flotta all Boeing.
 

vipero

Well-known member
Utente Registrato
8 Ottobre 2007
4,731
384
.
EASA published a Proposed Airworthiness Directive (PAD) concerning the Boeing 737 MAX for public consultation, signalling its intention to approve the aircraft to return to Europe’s skies within a matter of weeks.

The EASA Proposed Airworthiness Directive is now open for a 28-day consultation period. Once that ends, EASA will take time to review the comments made, before publishing its final Airworthiness Directive. That final publication is expected from mid-January 2021 and will constitute the formal ungrounding decision. EASA now proposes that the changes to the aircraft design which will be required by the final Airworthiness Directive will be accompanied by a mandatory training programme for pilots, including flight simulator training, to ensure that the pilots are familiar with all aspects of the flight control system of the #737MAX and will react appropriately to typical failure scenarios.

 

Casa

Well-known member
Utente Registrato
26 Novembre 2011
677
1
Consiglio di lettura dal NYT

Boeing’s 737 Max Is a Saga of Capitalism Gone Awry

“The Boeing Company for a good part of a century was the foremost and best airplane manufacturer in the world, but they got infected,” Representative Peter DeFazio, chairman of the House transportation committee, which led an investigation into the crashes, told me. “They started watching Wall Street. They started tying executive bonuses to stock performance. It was greedy executives doing shortsighted things to pad their pockets.”

[...]

Led by Harry Stonecipher, McDonnell Douglas was a company that prioritized boosting share price as much as making airplanes. Mr. Stonecipher was an alumnus of General Electric and had learned under Jack Welch, the profit-obsessed chief executive who made G.E. the most valuable company in the world through merciless downsizing and financial engineering.

When Mr. Stonecipher became chief executive of Boeing in 2003, he brought G.E.’s model with him: He slashed costs, reduced head count, ramped up outsourcing and increased Boeing’s share buyback program and shareholder dividends.

[...]

...an employee wrote to a colleague, “This airplane is designed by clowns, who are in turn supervised by monkeys.”