Velivoli senza pilota potranno far risparmiare $35 miliardi alle compagnie aeree


AZ209

Socio AIAC
Utente Registrato
24 Ottobre 2006
16,948
69
Londra.
Essendo un tema delicato va preso con le pinze, ma e' doveroso riportare quelle che sono le opportunita' ma anche i rischi che si affrontano nel settore.
Secondo una ricerca della banca svizzera UBS riportata da molte testate giornalistiche in giro per il mondo, la riduzione dei piloti a favore di tecnologie che faranno volare i velivoli senza il bisogno del pilota (umano) portera' un risparmio di $35 miliardi.
E' altrettanto vero che su un campione di 8.000 intervistati il 54% si e' dimostrato restio dal prendere un aereo senza il pilota umano.


Pilotless planes could save airlines $35 billion, UBS says


  • "Reducing the intervention of human pilots on aircraft could bring material economic benefits and improve safety," a UBS note said.
  • The bank stated that there could be a material profit opportunity of over $35 billion per year for the aerospace and aviation industry.
  • A recent UBS Evidence Lab Survey of 8,000 people however showed that 54 percent of participants were reluctant to take a pilotless flight.

Pilotless planes could not only be a future method of transport, but an economically-beneficial one too, according to new research by Swiss bank UBS which claims that they could save airlines billions of dollars.
"Reducing the intervention of human pilots on aircraft could bring material economic benefits and improve safety," UBS analysts wrote in a note published Monday.

In terms of material economic benefits, analysts from the bank stated that there could be a material profit opportunity of more than $35 billion per year for the aerospace and aviation industry.

To uncover these savings, UBS suggested that the sector would have to look at a number of elements, including how airlines could benefit from lower operating and training costs, reduced fuel costs and insurance premium costs. Overall, the Swiss bank said that there could be $26 billion in pilot cost savings for commercial airline firms alone.
"The opportunity, we believe, would be dependent on the timing of the roll-out of pilotless planes and we think it is likely we would initially see cargo the first subsector to adopt new related technologies, with the number of pilots falling from two to one and eventually from one to none," the note said.
Already, commercial aircrafts use computers and technology on-board to assist in a number of functions, including the autopilot system.
In June, Boeing stated that it was looking into the concept of pilotless technology, and last week announced that it was to set up an avionics group, in order to create aircraft controls and electronics, according to Reuters.
UBS added that it didn't think investors were pricing in any advantages for commercial airlines at present, as these benefits "may be more than five years out."

However, there are still issues that the industry is likely to face before this idea takes off.
Out of the 8,000 people who participated in a recent UBS Evidence Lab Survey, 54 percent said they were reluctant to take a pilotless flight, with only 17 percent stating that they would likely welcome the opportunity.
Delving into the survey's numbers, UBS stated that in terms of willingness to embark on a pilotless plane, younger participants between the age of 18 and 34 appeared more inclined, with 30 percent willing to try out the experience. UBS added that this could be beneficial for the industry, as "acceptance should grow with time."
Aside from customer viewpoints towards pilotless planes, the bank also noted that there would be "design, security and technological challenges" facing the idea of making this a reality, along with the need for more regulation in this area.

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/08/07/pil...industry-billions-of-us-dollars-ubs-note.html
 

TapiroVolante

Utente Registrato
13 Dicembre 2016
605
19
Da non professionista del settore ma semplice passeggero trovo la cosa difficilmente realizzabile, almeno per voli che trasportino bipedi (tra Sully ed un prodotto della Silicon Valley opterei indubbiamente per il primo...); idea che troverei invece interessante per i voli cargo.
Attenzione comunque ai rischi di hackeraggio...
 

indaco1

Utente Registrato
30 Settembre 2007
3,215
3
.
Ottimo esempio.

A favore delle macchine.

Se Sully fosse stato un computer invece che un lento e inefficiente umano, avrebbe potuto fare un assessment in pochi secondi constatando che poteva tornare all'aereoporto la Guardia invece che fare un bagnetto nell'Hudson River mettendo a rischio vite e buttando nel cesso un jet del valore di molti milioni di dollari.

The NTSB used flight simulators to test the possibility that the flight could have returned safely to LaGuardia or diverted to Teterboro; only seven of the thirteen simulated returns to La Guardia succeeded, and only one of the two to Teterboro.[85] Furthermore, the NTSB report called these simulations unrealistic: "The immediate turn made by the pilots during the simulations did not reflect or account for real-world considerations." A further simulation, conducted with the pilot delayed by 35 seconds, crashed.[86] In testimony before the NTSB, Sullenberger maintained that there had been no time to bring the plane to any airport, and that attempting to do so would likely have killed those onboard and more on the ground.[87]

The Board ultimately ruled that Sullenberger had made the correct decision,[87] reasoning that the checklist for dual-engine failure is designed for higher altitudes, when pilots have more time to deal with the situation, and that while simulations showed that the plane might have just barely made it back to LaGuardia, those scenarios assumed an instant decision to do so, with no time allowed for assessing the situation.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/US_Airways_Flight_1549
 

naplover

Utente Registrato
19 Agosto 2009
1,179
0
Poggiomarino - NAP
Ottimo esempio.

A favore delle macchine.

Se Sully fosse stato un computer invece che un lento e inefficiente umano, avrebbe potuto fare un assessment in pochi secondi constatando che poteva tornare all'aereoporto la Guardia invece che fare un bagnetto nell'Hudson River mettendo a rischio vite e buttando nel cesso un jet del valore di molti milioni di dollari.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/US_Airways_Flight_1549
Non posso non quotarti, ma io, sinceramente, non volerei su un aereo con meno di 2 piloti....
 

AZ209

Socio AIAC
Utente Registrato
24 Ottobre 2006
16,948
69
Londra.
Ulteriori numeri e punti di vista diversi:

Steve Landells, the British Airline Pilots Association's (Balpa) flight safety specialist, said: "We have concerns that in the excitement of this futuristic idea, some may be forgetting the reality of pilotless air travel."Automation in the cockpit is not a new thing - it already supports operations. However, every single day pilots have to intervene when the automatics don't do what they're supposed to.
"Computers can fail, and often do, and someone is still going to be needed to work that computer."

Extra revenue

UBS said that its projected savings for airlines would come through cutting pilot costs. It added that the business jet industry could save up to $3bn and civil helicopters about $2.1bn by introducing pilotless aircraft.
More than $3bn would also be saved in lower insurance premiums and there would be chances of extra revenue from increased numbers of cargo and commercial flights.
However, the savings could pale into insignificance if the numbers of people travelling by plane dropped.
Of the 54% of people who said they would be very unlikely to set foot inside a pilotless aircraft, the older age groups were the most resistant with more than half of people aged 45 to 54 shunning the idea.
The younger age groups were a bit more receptive, though, with the 25-to-34 age group most likely to give it a try (30%).

Improved safety

While flying is generally regarded as one of the safest forms of travel, the UBS report suggested that pilotless planes would make it even more secure.
It found that around 70% to 80% of the accidents that do occur are the result of human error, with crew fatigue responsible for 15% to 20% of those.
It is also clear that if pilotless planes were to become the norm, then military levels of security both inside the plane and in communications would be vital.
Acceptance of the concept would also be crucial to its success.

Jarrod Castle, UBS's head of business services, leisure and travel research, told the BBC: "It is a question of public perception and people being comfortable with the idea.
"Clearly a seven-hour flight carrying 200 to 300 people would be the last part of the evolution but we also feel that machines can gradually take over and then reduce the number of pilots in the cockpit from two to one over time."

Céline Fornaro of UBS added: "The smaller the plane and amount of passengers, the more realistic it is to see this.
"It is not just our view, companies like Airbus are trying to get into this world where you could have small helicopters carrying two or three people unmanned."
Air transport consultant John Strickland believes pilotless planes could definitely become a reality, as long as certain hurdles are overcome.
"It is conceivable but would be some way off in the future," he told the BBC. "There would have to be an overall focus on safety and there would be a psychological barrier to get over to win the public's trust.
"We step on monorails at airports and travel in some driverless trains and cars, but the whole psychology of being in the air and not having humans at the front is quite a challenge."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40860911
 

Robyjet

Utente Registrato
14 Dicembre 2007
252
0
65
Fiumicino, Lazio.
e quanti posti in più per pax si potrebbero ottenere eliminando il cockpit? in fondo a quel punto tutto quello spazio non servirebbe più
 

13900

Utente Registrato
26 Aprile 2012
6,789
1,152
L'automazione è un processo che, fino ad adesso, s'è visto poco nel mondo dell'aviazione civile (specialmente se lo si compara con, che ne so, altri processi industriali); ciononostante sta iniziando, ed è inevitabile che tocchi anche la cabina di pilotaggio.

Oggi ci sono già robot nella sala dei bagagli del Terminal 3 di LHR, addetti al riempimento dei bins AKE; ci sono pushback tractors Mototok che non hanno un autista, ma un addetto che può anche fare da wing walker (e probabilmente, in futuro, riusciranno ad essere controllati remotamente per fare anche towing); sono allo studio jetways automatiche, che non hanno bisogno del dispatcher, dollies per i cargo e le valigie automatiche, bus anch'essi senza autista e così via. Anche a guardare attività come load control, se uno va a vedere Altéa si rende conto che molto è fatto automaticamente, usando dati storici, e l'input umano è minimo.

Per come la vedo io il rischio non è tanto per la sicurezza, o hacking (alla fin fine usiamo già ora metropolitane automatiche e gli aerei possono essere hackerati già ora, senza che i piloti possano farci granché), ma lavorativo. Non so come sia il dibattito in Italia, qui in UK sta iniziando la discussione sull'eticità di spingere per un'automazione che, inevitabilmente, porterà a grandi perdite lavorative, con stime che parlano di milioni - forse il 30% - dei posti di lavoro potenzialmente a rischio per via "delle macchine". Quale governo troverebbe questa prospettiva appetibile?
 

flapane

Utente Registrato
6 Giugno 2011
2,432
32
DUS/NAP
Si parla anche di prevedere tasse da reinvestire per riparare ai "danni" dell'industria 4.0, vedi formazione.
L'ultima fiera di Hannover era piuttosto illuminante, circa quale sarà il trend dei prossimi anni, che piaccia o meno.
Non ho, comunque, il coraggio di chiedermi quali potranno essere le conseguenze, almeno in un paese poco dinamico come l'Italia, ed anche chi se lo è chiesto "ai piani alti", non è in grado di dare una risposta.
 

Fewwy

Utente Registrato
19 Agosto 2014
659
35
Torino
È sicuramente una strada che verrà intrapesa, tra opposte fazioni, passando attraverso il compromesso del "va bé, cominciamo a toglierne uno e vediamo come va" (che significherà comunque portarsi a casa il 50% di quei 35 miliardi di risparmi).

Tra le automazioni citate da 13900 aggiungerei anche le remote tower in campo ATC per gli aeroporti minori, che sono praticamente a un passo dal realizzarsi.
 

indaco1

Utente Registrato
30 Settembre 2007
3,215
3
.
L'agente unico e' una realta' sui treni da un po' di tempo, e comunque e' stata una battaglia.

Un aereo stracolmo di tecnologia e solo il comandante, niente FO, potrebbe essere molto ma molto piu' sicuro di oggi. Praticamente tutti gli incidenti aerei piu' gravi degli ultimi decenni (inclusi suicidi e attacchi terroristici) avrebbero potuto essere prevenuti da opportune tecnologie e connessioni con servizi di supporto a terra.

Il comandante dovra' comandare, non pilotare, se non come backup in caso di tempesta solare o attacco hacker quando tutti gli strati di sistemi che si controllano tra loro dovranno essere esclusi per ridare il controllo al sistema biologico umano.

E non sono sicuro che l'umano sia il piu' fidato: dargli la possibilita' di escludere i sistemi potrebbe essere piu' pericoloso che non dargliela, come dimostrano i casi di suicidio e terrorismo purtroppo avvenuti negli ultimi anni.

Comunque da passeggero rinuncio volentieri al secondo pilota in cambio di tecnologia che mi da molta piu' sicurezza e biglietti leggermente meno cari non solo per lo stipendio del FO risparmiato ma anche per gli incassi per una suite di prima classe ultrapanoramica posizionata su meta' di quella che oggi e' la cabina di pilotaggio :-D

Al comandante possono svegliarlo se succede qualcosa che richiede la sua atternzione mentre siamo sull'oceano.
 

SPEEDBIRD97

Utente Registrato
1 Luglio 2016
33
0
L'agente unico e' una realta' sui treni da un po' di tempo, e comunque e' stata una battaglia.

Un aereo stracolmo di tecnologia e solo il comandante, niente FO, potrebbe essere molto ma molto piu' sicuro di oggi. Praticamente tutti gli incidenti aerei piu' gravi degli ultimi decenni (inclusi suicidi e attacchi terroristici) avrebbero potuto essere prevenuti da opportune tecnologie e connessioni con servizi di supporto a terra.

Il comandante dovra' comandare, non pilotare, se non come backup in caso di tempesta solare o attacco hacker quando tutti gli strati di sistemi che si controllano tra loro dovranno essere esclusi per ridare il controllo al sistema biologico umano.

E non sono sicuro che l'umano sia il piu' fidato: dargli la possibilita' di escludere i sistemi potrebbe essere piu' pericoloso che non dargliela, come dimostrano i casi di suicidio e terrorismo purtroppo avvenuti negli ultimi anni.

Comunque da passeggero rinuncio volentieri al secondo pilota in cambio di tecnologia che mi da molta piu' sicurezza e biglietti leggermente meno cari non solo per lo stipendio del FO risparmiato ma anche per gli incassi per una suite di prima classe ultrapanoramica posizionata su meta' di quella che oggi e' la cabina di pilotaggio :-D

Al comandante possono svegliarlo se succede qualcosa che richiede la sua atternzione mentre siamo sull'oceano.
Il fatto è che per diventare comandanti si deve inevitabilmente passare come f/o, e se questo viene sostituito da una macchina dove si accumula più quell'esperienza per diventare cpt?

Sent from my ALE-L21 using Tapatalk
 

robygun

Utente Registrato
27 Gennaio 2013
726
28
Peccato che il treno sia un veicolo a guida vincolata e che se il macchinista si vola un segnale senza reagire opportunamente il sistema tira la rapida e ti inchioda il convoglio..

Paragonare treni ed aerei è assurdo..


PS io sono strafelice di pagare un po' di più il biglietto pur di avere DUE UMANI la davanti, un computer è per forza di cose limitato alla sua programmazione, e il mondo non gira tutto ad uni e zeri..
 

Tiennetti

Utente Registrato
6 Novembre 2005
3,915
28
38
Venessia
www.david.aero
Il risparmio globale sarà anche di 35 Billions, ma su un biglietto saremmo forse nell'ordine dell'1%
Siete veramente sicuri che la vostra tranquillità e la vostra sicurezza possano essere comprate con questa cifra?
 

Fewwy

Utente Registrato
19 Agosto 2014
659
35
Torino
Il comandante dovra' comandare, non pilotare, se non come backup in caso di tempesta solare o attacco hacker quando tutti gli strati di sistemi che si controllano tra loro dovranno essere esclusi per ridare il controllo al sistema biologico umano.
Oddio, così mi sembra eccessivo. Io farei il contrario: il pilota potrà continuare a volare e la tecnologià fungerà da fail-safe system.
 

Paolo_61

Socio AIAC
Utente Registrato
2 Febbraio 2012
6,484
70
Il risparmio globale sarà anche di 35 Billions, ma su un biglietto saremmo forse nell'ordine dell'1%
Siete veramente sicuri che la vostra tranquillità e la vostra sicurezza possano essere comprate con questa cifra?
Se con me volano anche i programmatori sì

Battute a parte, l'unica cosa che di questo programma non mi preoccupa è la diminuzione dei posti di lavoro. La storia della rivoluzione industriale ha sempre dimostrato che tutti i miglioramenti tecnologici, avversati dal tempo del luddismo, alla fine hanno condotto a un incremento sia dell'occupazione sia della ricchezza prodotta (e di conseguenza distribuibile fra i fattori della produzione).
 

atlantique

Utente Registrato
4 Ottobre 2008
2,669
5
Cito testualmente:

Most importantly, no computer, no matter how sophisticated, flying an autonomous jetliner will ever have the most effective form of motivation possible when it comes making those kinds of very high stakes decisions in the air - self-preservation. Respondents to the UBS survey likely did not think about it such terms, but they also probably inherently understood the value of having a couple of real people sitting in the pointy end of the plane, people who have real skin in the game.

Articolo completo al seguente link

https://www.forbes.com/sites/daniel...-for-the-growing-pilot-shortage/#13defb803527
 

atlantique

Utente Registrato
4 Ottobre 2008
2,669
5
Se Sully fosse stato un computer invece che un lento e inefficiente umano, avrebbe potuto fare un assessment in pochi secondi constatando che poteva tornare all'aereoporto la Guardia invece che fare un bagnetto nell'Hudson River mettendo a rischio vite e buttando nel cesso un jet del valore di molti milioni di dollari.
Sei consapevole che quel giorno e in quella circostanza l'assesment del computer e' stato che l'unico mezzo motore che gli era rimasto disponibile era in avaria e aveva suggerito al "lento" Sully di spegnerlo?
Immagina se avessero spento quell'unico mezzo motore che gli era rimasto come sarebbe finita.
 

PSEU

Bannato
19 Luglio 2016
46
0
Sei consapevole che quel giorno e in quella circostanza l'assesment del computer e' stato che l'unico mezzo motore che gli era rimasto disponibile era in avaria e aveva suggerito al "lento" Sully di spegnerlo?
Immagina se avessero spento quell'unico mezzo motore che gli era rimasto come sarebbe finita.
Massì lascialo perdere, probabilmente vendendo cocco in spiaggia (con tutto il rispetto per i venditori di cocco bello) ha preso un colpo di caldo...e adesso dall'alto della sua esperienza valuta un Comandante con xx mila ore di volo.

però mi ha fatto sorridere =)