Qantas verso voli nonstop verso l'Europa


DusCgn

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Qantas targets non-stops from Europe to Sydney

21 Sep 2016

Qantas is eyeing new technology aircraft to deliver it the ability to fly non-stop to the world.



QANTAS’ will continue to concentrate on Asia and North America while it waits for new ultra long-range “hub-buster” aircraft to give it the ability to offer unique non-stop services between Australia and markets in Europe. That is the message from the airline’s group chief executive Alan Joyce who is looking to new technology aircraft such as the Boeing 787s it has on order plus either Boeing new 777X or the Airbus A350 to deliver the airline unprecedented non-stop capability. Those non-stops will likely be London to Perth with the 787 followed later by routes such as Paris to Sydney and Rome to Melbourne. The airline looked some years ago at using Jetstar to service destinations in Southern Europe Mr Joyce says the low-cost offshoot won’t be joining Scoot and AirAsia X on the “kangaroo route” to Europe any time soon. “I think Jetstar’s got so many growth opportunities in Asia,’’ Joyce says, pointing to recent announcements that the brand’s Japanese joint venture will grow from 20 to 28 aircraft and Veitnam’s Jetstar Pacific would be adding 10. “I think we have enough growth in this region and … we have a solution to Europe, which is the Emirates partnership.’’ The Emirates partnership gives Qantas 40 destinations in Europe without the need to invest the capital to operate its own services and, says Joyce, gives the Australian carrier a reach it could never have achieved on its own. But that doesn’t mean the flying kangaroo, famed for its ability to convince aircraft manufacturers to help it conquer long distances, doesn’t see opportunities further down the track. Joyce says technology is the airline’s friend and he’s keen to see what opportunities Qantas International’s new fleet of Boeing 787-9s can open up. The airline is preparing for the arrival of the first of eight B787s at the end of the next year and plans to start selling Dreamliner flights on its existing network before Christmas. The planes will replace five older Boeing 747s and will be fitted with luxury business class seats, roomier economy seats and what the carrier describes as “a revolutionary premium economy that is streets ahead of anything out there’’. Possible new routes include a non-stop service between Perth and London made possible by the 787-9’s 7,635 nm (14,140 km) nominal range. London remains a destination for Qantas because of the size of the market and the traditionally strong links between Australia and the UK. But with 32 competitors on routes to Europe, Joyce argues the airline currently cannot make other ports on the continent pay, particularly with the one-stop flights that would be required from Australia’s East Coast. “The dilemma you always have with the Qantas Group is that it is out of an Australian cost base, it is a long distance from your home and the costs are a lot higher as a consequence of that,’’ says Joyce “So I think our future is the direct flights.’’ The long-term potential is for non-stop premium services to European ports other airlines would struggle to match, including Sydney-London, using planes such as ultra-long range Boeing 777-8X due to enter service at the end of the decade. The 777-8X, which builds on the technological advances made by the 787 program with enhancements such as carbon fibre high-span wings, will be able to carry 350 to 375 passengers up to 8,700 nm (16,110 km) in a wider cabin. “We’re never going to fly to the 40 destinations Emirates has but you could be flying to a few of those top destinations,’’ Joyce says, noting that the combination of direct and indirect services “gives you a very feasible and economic operation in Europe that works very well”. For now, however, China and the US are the main game. “We talk about Europe a lot but people forget how big the US is for Qantas,’’ Joyce says, adding that the airline’s Airbus A380 services to partner American Airlines’ hub in Dallas, Texas, are “booming’’. “We’d love to be able to fly more destinations into the states.’’ The 787-9s open up Melbourne-Dallas and Brisbane-Dallas as potential destinations with daily services to cities such as Vancouver also a possibility. “And then eventually with the aircraft in the next decade, you’ll have New York direct and that means Chicago direct,’’ Joyce says. “That means a lot of destinations in the US that have the viability to have direct services start coming on to the radar screen.’’ The alliance with American Airlines remains the biggest for Qantas, despite the higher profile of its marriage with Emirates, but that may be set to change. Australia’s competition regulator recently gave an alliance with China Eastern a green light and Joyce believes that rapid tourism growth out of China will ultimately make this the flying kangaroo’s biggest partnership. The airline is also set to benefit from Chinese tourism growth through partnerships with China Southern and Hong Kong’s Cathay Pacific. “The stats just blow you away,” Joyce says. “I think we have 1.2 million visitors from China and we get 1 per cent of the worldwide visitor rate of over 100 million that go overseas. “Some estimates have that growing to over 500 million in the next decades. Even if we stay at just 1 per cent, the total of the Chinese visitors (coming) here nearly gets to the 7 million total visitors that we have now. “And when they come to Australia, they typically take an average two domestic sectors when they’re travelling, so the benefits to the domestic network, not only the international one, are quite huge.’’ “So the potential to tap into a hugely different market that benefits the whole tourism economy is massive in the Chinese market and that’s quite exciting.’’ While Joyce can see growth in all parts of the business from China, including a Qantas service to Shanghai that now operates from China Eastern’s terminal, he is particularly excited about the price-sensitive end of the market. He sees a big potential in charter services such as the one recently operated by Jetstar between Australia’s Gold Coast and the Chinese city of Wuhan with the Dalian Wanda Group. The year-long Gold Coast deal to sell combined flight and holiday packages ends on October 1 and the parties are working on new services to Australia to begin in time for the Chinese New Year. Working in conjunction with travel groups such as Wanda means Qantas or its Jetstar affiliates do not have to incur the expense of setting up a distribution network in China. “They sell the seats and they actually package it,’’ he says. “So Jetstar Vietnam, Jetstar Singapore and Jetstar Japan all will be participating in that growth as well and they’re all doing various forms of charter activity.’’ Another plus out of China for Qantas is, surprisingly, freight. The group has unique freight traffic rights which allow it to fly a triangular Australia-China-US-Australia route using wet leased freighters (aircraft leased with crew) from Atlas Air. The route has given Qantas Freight about 5 per cent of the China-Us freight market and Joyce says it has been participating well in growth over time. Australia-China has always been its weakest leg but Joyce says a free trade agreement between the two countries is starting to see this improve with a range of new products. Of course, Qantas isn’t the only airline with Chinese aspirations. Virgin Australia’s John Borghetti also sees a big growth potential from the world’s most populous nation and now has two major Chinese groups, Nanshan and Hainan, as major shareholders. Joyce is unfazed by Virgin’s new shareholders and says he’s happy with Qantas’s position and its partnership with two carriers enjoying strong growth and support. “I think it’s such a huge market that there’s plenty for everybody on it,’’ he says “ And you know I’d say with the China market I’d rather have the big players as well. I think China Southern for example just reached 700 aircraft, which makes it the fourth largest airline in the world.’’ Another point Joyce makes is that Qantas is a different organisation from the one it was a few years ago. The airline made a net profit of more than $1 billion in the year ended June 30, 2016, with a 60 per cent rise in underlying pre-tax profit, the best result in the airline’s 95-year history. It declared its first shareholder dividend since 2009 and saw record earnings from all business units – except freight. The result was partly driven by a $664 million benefit from lower global fuel prices but also by a transformation program that has unlocked $1.66 billion in permanent cost and revenue benefits since 2014 and expects to see that rise to $2.1 billion by next June. One result of the changes, according to Joyce, is that airline group well-placed to cope with the often quickly changing aviation environment. “What’s great, I think, about where you see Qantas today compared to where it was when it had its previous record earnings back in 2007 is they are coming from a bigger variety of things,’’ he says. “We have a lot bigger frequent flyer program than we had back then, which is making over $300 million. Jetstar made over $400 million, a record profit for Jetstar, but what’s great in the results is that Qantas International and Qantas Domestic also had a record profit. Joyce is particularly pleased with a billion-dollar turnaround in the international business that prompted the airline to invest in the long-awaited B787s. “Every business has earned the right to grow and we are now in an enviable position of figuring out what’s the growth opportunities for the businesses going forward — where do we invest the capital, how do we grow to take advantage of the really solid position each of the businesses are in?’’ he says “And that’s very different from where we were in the past, where usually it’s one component of the business that contributes all the profits and some of the others were underperforming.’’ However, he also acknowledges that low fuel prices have been accompanied by international fares at historic lows in some markets and a global economy that is at best mixed. He observes that the Australian economy is also going through a transition which saw Qantas drop more than $250m in resource sector revenue, although it managed to redeploy aircraft to the East Coast to take advantage of the property boom and leisure routes have been going well.. “So you’ve definitely got a mixed environment and what I think we’ve changed in our culture here is the ability to be agile and to move things around to take advantage of that,’’ he says. With the 787s and Airbus A320 neos on the way for Jetstar, the group has a sizeable commitment to new planes but Joyce says it will continue to take a cautious view on capital management. Investments such as new lounges, new seats on existing aircraft and, increasingly, information technology all clamour for a slice of what will be a $4.5 billion capital expenditure pie over the next three years. “It’s a lot of money but there are lot demands for growth, there are a lot of demands for new businesses, there are a lot of demands for new seats,’’ he says. “And we have a prioritisation within the organisation for that capital demand and that it’s allocated to the right things. “I think Qantas is a lot better at doing that than it did before so everything gets done. The pace at which it gets done has to fit into our capital program and the ability, like any business would have, of the business to be able to pay for it.’’ The airline has 15 options and 30 purchase orders for the Dreamliner and Joyce says he wants to see how they perform before ordering more. Even if that happens, further orders are likely to be incremental and Joyce says it could be as little as one at a time under the agreement the airline has with Boeing. Qantas has yet to determine whether it will order the new Boeing 777-8X as a replacement for its 12 still relatively young A380 superjumbos. When the time comes, it will run a competition between the new Boeing widebody and Airbus’s A350-1000. “We always run a competition on every aircraft type and there are no certainties on these things,’’ says Joyce. “But what I think is always the case in the airline industry is that you’re always continuously monitoring what’s your potential replacement. So the minute you get a new aircraft you’re thinking about what’s going to be in the future the aircraft that has to replace it.’’ Qantas will not exercise options to take an eight additional A380s but Joyce says the existing fleet has worked well for Qantas on Los Angeles, Dallas, London and, on occasion, Hong Kong. Asked how the 380s stack up against the new planes, Joyce says they work well on high volume, long distance routes to hub cities. Qantas has five services that depart Los Angeles within a small window and Joyce says flying smaller aircraft would not be as cost-effective and would mean too many frequencies. “So you’ve got the A380 which is a very, big efficient vehicle – and it depends on oil prices as well.,’’ he says. “Today the 380s look a lot better than they did with oil prices over $US100 .’’ He adds that oil prices also determine the roll-over or replacement case for aircraft but declines to predict what will happen in that arena, describing picking fuel trends as a “fool’s game’’. “We always hedge and we are hedging and we’ve communicated our hedging for financial year 17 and we’re hedging into 18,’’ he says. “And the idea is to give you time to cope with whatever the fuel price is and not try to put a bet on where fuel’s going to be.’’ - See more at: http://www.airlineratings.com/news/...ps-from-europe-to-sydney#sthash.Lu4oMtkn.dpuf
 

Cesare.Caldi

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Re: QANTAS verso voli nonstop verso l'Europa

Qantas eyes ultra-longhaul flights from East Australia coast

Qantas (QF, Sydney Kingsford Smith) is studying the possibility of introducing ultra-longhaul flights from Australia to Europe. Speaking to Airline Ratings, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Alan Joyce said the expansion would come following the arrival of its B787-9s and a potential order for A350-900(ULR)s or the B777-8s.

Routes that are being considered include Perth Int'l – London Heathrow with the B787-9 and later on Sydney Kingsford Smith – Paris CDG and Melbourne Tullamarine – Rome Fiumicino. Joyce said the Australian carrier had previously looked into launching flights to Southern Europe through its low cost arm Jetstar Airways (JQ, Melbourne Tullamarine) but decided against the move as it saw greater potential in the Asian market instead. Qantas currently covers a number of European destinations through its codeshare partnership with Emirates (EK, Dubai Int'l) and itself serves London Heathrow from both Melbourne and Sydney via Dubai.

Qantas has acquired eight B787-9s to replace five of its older B747-400s in use on international routes. Four of the aircraft will arrive during the carrier's 2018 financial year - July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018 - with the remainder due the following year - July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019. Joyce recently said the airline is studying the A350-900(ULR) alongside the B777-8 for its longterm ultra-longhaul needs. Besides Europe, the carrier also plans to use the aircraft on flights to the United States.

“We talk about Europe a lot but people forget how big the US is for Qantas. Eventually with the aircraft in the next decade, you’ll have New York direct and that means Chicago direct”, he said. “That means a lot of destinations in the US that have the viability to have direct services start coming on to the radar screen”.

ch aviation
 

Cesare.Caldi

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Re: QANTAS verso voli nonstop verso l'Europa

FCO-MEL sono 16mila km, 9900 e rotte miglia... praticamente quasi 18-19 ore di volo!!!
Pazzesco secondo me ci si stanca anche in business, non immagino neanche farmi 18 ore in economy... meglio fare scalo nel golfo e spezzare un volo cosi lungo. Inoltre un volo cosi lungo avrebbe dei costi operativi notevoli per la compagnia e di conseguenza anche i prezzi dei biglietti immagino sarebbero decisamente piu' cari dei voli con scalo delle compagnie del golfo.
 

kenadams

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Re: QANTAS verso voli nonstop verso l'Europa

Non-stop ipotizzabili (forse) finché il costo del petrolio rimarrà sotto i $50.
 

Andrea1988

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Re: QANTAS verso voli nonstop verso l'Europa

Mettiamo una media di 700$ a testa a tratta, tra economy e business/first... 250 passeggeri... 175.000$ in caso di aereo pieno (cosa ovviamente non scontata). Quali potrebbero essere i costi per un volo del genere?
 

filippo.c

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Re: QANTAS verso voli nonstop verso l'Europa

Per me è solo un'idea che resterà sulla carta. Umanamente è impossibile.
 

I-DADO

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Re: QANTAS verso voli nonstop verso l'Europa

Mettiamo una media di 700$ a testa a tratta, tra economy e business/first... 250 passeggeri... 175.000$ in caso di aereo pieno (cosa ovviamente non scontata). Quali potrebbero essere i costi per un volo del genere?
Appunto, il 787 farà fuori tranquillamente 7.000 e passa € all'ora di cherosene, più il personale, più il catering, senza contare gli ammortamenti. E devi riempire l'aereo.

Con le golfare si riesce spesso a viaggiare attorno ai 1000 € e poco più a/r tra l'Italia e l'Australia.

Non vedo proprio, a barte la boutade propagandistica, quale fondamento economico possa avere una rotta come la FCO-MEL .
 

freez267

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Re: QANTAS verso voli nonstop verso l'Europa

il 778, se rispetta la specifiche del programma e il 359
Sono voli che magari verranno anche messi in piedi (sempre che il petrolio non risalga) ma saranno marginali rispetto a tutti i posti offerti sulle tratte EU-Australia offerte dalle compagnie del golfo

L'unica vera rotta che avrebbe veramente traffico sarebbe una London-Sydney che con 10,561 miglia sarà impraticabile anche la prossima generazione
http://www.gcmap.com/mapui?P=LON-SYD
 

Paolo_61

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Re: QANTAS verso voli nonstop verso l'Europa

Sono voli che magari verranno anche messi in piedi (sempre che il petrolio non risalga) ma saranno marginali rispetto a tutti i posti offerti sulle tratte EU-Australia offerte dalle compagnie del golfo

L'unica vera rotta che avrebbe veramente traffico sarebbe una London-Sydney che con 10,561 miglia sarà impraticabile anche la prossima generazione
http://www.gcmap.com/mapui?P=LON-SYD
Ovviamente il fatto che sia tecnicamente fattibile non garantisce che sia economicamente sensata.
 

DusCgn

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Re: QANTAS verso voli nonstop verso l'Europa

Sono voli che magari verranno anche messi in piedi (sempre che il petrolio non risalga) ma saranno marginali rispetto a tutti i posti offerti sulle tratte EU-Australia offerte dalle compagnie del golfo

L'unica vera rotta che avrebbe veramente traffico sarebbe una London-Sydney che con 10,561 miglia sarà impraticabile anche la prossima generazione
http://www.gcmap.com/mapui?P=LON-SYD
è la stessa distanza del SYD-CDG che cita il CEO di QF.
Trovo tuttavia anch'io irrealistico che questi voli vedano davvero un inizio
 

belumosi

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Re: QANTAS verso voli nonstop verso l'Europa

Qantas to adjust long-haul network with advent of Perth-London



  • 27 APRIL, 2017
  • SOURCE: FLIGHTGLOBAL PRO
  • BY: GREG WALDRON
  • SINGAPORE
Qantas Airways will drop its daily Melbourne-Dubai-London route in March 2018 when it launches daily Melbourne-Perth-London service.

The Oneworld carrier detailed the network change in its announcement that tickets for the Perth-London route have gone on sale.
The Melbourne-Dubai-London route is served by Airbus A380 aircraft, while it will use the Boeing 787-9 aircraft on the new routing.
Qantas passengers in Melbourne will still have the option of flying on a Qantas code to Dubai with its partner airline, Emirates.
From 25 March 2018, Emirates will upgauge its third daily Melbourne-Dubai service from a Boeing 777-300ER to an A380.
By dropping the Melbourne-Dubai-London routing, Qantas frees up an A380 aircraft. This will be deployed during high demand periods from Melbourne and Sydney to cities in Asia such as Singapore and Hong Kong.
"The travel experience for customers connecting in Perth will be seamless, with Qantas building a new international transit lounge at Perth Airport," adds the carrier.
"People joining the flight to London from other parts of Australia (including regional Western Australia and Adelaide) will find it a smooth transition with international and domestic flights arriving and departing from the same terminal, complete with dedicated customs and immigration."

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/a...st-long-haul-network-with-advent-of-p-436631/


QANTAS opens Perth – London bookings for March 2018 launch

By Jim Liu

Posted27 April 2017 03:20

QANTAS today (27APR17) filed operational schedule for planned Perth – London Heathrow route, marking the first ever nonstop service between Australia and UK, previously announced by the airline. From 24MAR18, QANTAS Boeing 787-9 aircraft will operate Melbourne – Perth – London Heathrow route on daily basis as QF009/010, which will replace existing Melbourne – Dubai – London Heathrow A380 operation.

Operational schedule filed GDS approximately 0200hrs GMT 27APR17, while reservation is gradually opening in all class of service. Planned operational schedule, Subject to Government Approval, effective from 01APR18 as follow.

QF009 MEL1520 – 1720PER1850 – 0510+1LHR 789 D (flying time for PER LHR is 17hrs 20mins)
QF010 LHR1330 – 1315+1PER1445+1 – 2020+1MEL 789 D (flying time for LHR PER is 16hrs 45mins)

The configuration of the 787-9 is J42W28Y166.

http://www.routesonline.com/news/38...-perth-london-bookings-for-march-2018-launch/
 

AZ209

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Re: QANTAS verso voli nonstop verso l'Europa

Senza aprire un nuovo thread, QF ha pubblicato oggi i risultati FY17.
852M(AUSD) di utili e secondo miglior risultato di sempre. Anche se in calo del 17% rispetto al 2016.
Qantas Domestic e Qantas Loyalty sono state le divisioni che hanno performato meglio e portato piu' utili al gruppo.

Tutti i risultati nel dettaglio qui:
http://investor.qantas.com/FormBuil...l-year-results/FY17preliminaryFinalReport.pdf
 

Dancrane

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Re: QANTAS verso voli nonstop verso l'Europa

In tema con il thread, articolo di oggi dedicato a Qantas, che vuole convincere Airbus e Boeing a sviluppare rispettivamente il 359 ed il 777X a potere coprire le tratte SYD/LHR e SYD/JFK senza scalo (la prima sarebbe una rotta da oltre 20 ore di volo!). Nei desiderata della compagnia, il tutto dovrebbe potere partire nel 2022.

http://www.repubblica.it/viaggi/201...022-173825176/?ref=RHPPRT-BS-I0-C4-P1-S1.4-T1
 

AZ209

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Re: QANTAS verso voli nonstop verso l'Europa

In tema con il thread, articolo di oggi dedicato a Qantas, che vuole convincere Airbus e Boeing a sviluppare rispettivamente il 359 ed il 777X a potere coprire le tratte SYD/LHR e SYD/JFK senza scalo (la prima sarebbe una rotta da oltre 20 ore di volo!). Nei desiderata della compagnia, il tutto dovrebbe potere partire nel 2022.
Ecco il messaggio originale di Alan Joyce:
So the time is right to set ourselves a new challenge. To chase a new frontier.We want to offer direct flights to Europe not only from Perth but from the eastern states as well.
That’s why I’m pleased to announce that Qantas will challenge Boeing and Airbus to deliver an aircraft capable of flying regular direct services like Sydney-London, Brisbane-Paris and Melbourne-New York non-stop with a full payload by 2022.
This is a last frontier in global aviation.
The antidote to the tyranny of distance.
And a revolution for air travel in Australia.
A direct flight would cut up to four hours of travel time off a journey to London.
Removing the need to stop mid-way means your journey is uninterrupted. Less chance for delays on the ground; more time watching movies and sleeping. And a faster trip door to door.
I have written to the CEOs of Boeing and Airbus to extend the challenge to them.
Both manufacturers are developing aircraft that can almost do the job – the Boeing 777X and the Airbus A350ULR. We believe advances in the next few years will close the gap, and Qantas has the unique operational experience to be the airline that helps make it happen.
This would be one of the most strategically important aircraft orders in the history of Qantas.
But there is a lot of work to scope this fully. And we’re calling it Project Sunrise – a nod to the legendary Double Sunrise flights operated by Qantas across the Indian Ocean during World War 2. They remained airborne long enough to see two sunrises in what was an incredible feat of endurance given the technology of the day.
This is the kind of pioneering spirit that the national carrier is built on. And it’s the kind of spirit that we want to take us forward.
Diciamo che e' EK non farebbe i salti di gioia qualora accadesse.