News flotta & destinazioni British Airways

TW 843

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Heathrow Reports £1 Billion First Half Loss As Passengers Drop 60%

London’s Heathrow Airport today revealed that is has lost just over £1 billion ($1.30 billion) before tax and adjustments in the first six months of 2020. The news comes as the airport simultaneously revealed that passengers using the airport had fallen by 60% compared to the same period in 2019. In more positive news, the airport is starting to show signs of recovery.
 

leerit

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Venti di sciopero a British Airways in piena stagione estiva. In una lettera rivolta all’amministratore delegato della compagnia, Alex Cruz, il più forte sindacato inglese – Unite – accusa il vettore di sfruttare la pandemia del coronavirus come copertura per imporre un piano a lungo termine con 12mila licenziamenti, per poi procedere alle riassunzioni con reinserimenti a condizioni salariali inferiori fino al 40% rispetto alle attuali retribuzioni.


Il sindacato, guidato dal segretario generale Len McCluskey, è pronto allo sciopero per contrastare questa mossa della compagnia aerea. Una minaccia che produrrebbe ulteriori disagi per i viaggi estivi da e per il Regno Unito, già fortemente penalizzati dalle restrizioni sanitarie, con migliaia di voli cancellati.


Unite, che rappresenta migliaia di membri dell’equipaggio di cabina, ingegneri e personale di manutenzione che lavorano per British, è convinta che i vertici della compagnia aerea stiano pianificando i licenziamenti con la contestuale promessa di reinserimento, semplicemente per attuare un taglio generalizzato degli stipendi.


Un’ipotesi avvalorata da un recente accordo raggiunto da British Airways con i suoi piloti che prevede 270 licenziamenti, rispetto ai 1.250 previsti inizialmente, in cambio di forti tagli agli stipendi. Da sottolineare che la compagnia inglese, di proprietà di International Airlines Group (Iag) sta attualmente operando solo il 15% della sua abituale offerta aerea, a causa di una bassissima domanda aerea, perdendo circa 20 milioni di sterline (circa 22 milioni di euro) al giorno.


https://www.lagenziadiviaggi.it/tagli-per-british-airways-sindacati-verso-lo-sciopero-dagosto/
 

Axel91

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British Airways ha annunciato il ritiro dalla sua flotta dei due Airbus A318, impiegati esclusivamente sulla rotta Londra - New York (voli BA1 e BA2) e configurati con 32 posti business.
 

Axel91

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Sempre BA ha annunciato che non ci sarà nessun volo speciale di addio del Boeing 747 dalla sua flotta.... che tristezza :(
 
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AlicorporateUK

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Anger rises as British Airways cuts start to bite

It has been dubbed "Black Friday" by unions.

Thousands of long-serving cabin crew at British Airways are expected to find out on Friday whether or not they will be made redundant.
Many of those who remain will suffer steep pay cuts, and significant changes to their terms and conditions.
Other workers such as engineers, ground crew and office staff are also expected to hear whether they have a future at the airline over the coming days.
British Airways says more than 6,000 staff across the business have applied for voluntary redundancy
The airline has begun culling employee positions as part of a major cost-cutting drive, which it insists is vital to ensure its long-term survival.
But the way in which it has done so has provoked deep resentment among a large proportion of its workforce - and threats of industrial action.

'Absolutely gutted'
"I'm looking at losing 50% of my take-home pay", says Vicky - a cabin crew member who works in BA's long-haul fleet.
"I'm a single mother. I can't afford to have half of my pay taken away from me".
Vicky - not her real name - is in her mid-thirties. She has been with the company for more than 15 years.
Although she lives in the north east, she was among hundreds of staff who travelled to BA's headquarters near Heathrow earlier this week, to vent their anger at the company's management.
"It's the most stressful time I've ever been through", she says. "I feel absolutely gutted".

Job cuts plan
British Airways, like other airlines, has suffered deeply from the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. In the three months to the end of June it lost more than £700m.
For weeks, at the height of the lockdown, the bulk of its fleet was grounded, and it was unable to operate more than a handful of planes each day.
The company does not expect the aviation industry to recover fully until at least 2023.
In April, its parent company International Airlines Group (IAG) announced plans for a major restructuring of BA's business, which it said could result in up to 12,000 redundancies.
BA then made it clear it needed to cut costs dramatically - and warned that concessions would be needed from remaining staff on pay, as well as on terms and conditions.
It said that if an agreement could not be reached with unions, it would force its plans through - by handing staff their notice, and offering them new contracts on different terms.

'Ultimatum'
Unions have condemned this policy as "fire and rehire".
It has also been heavily criticised by many MPs, with the chair of the transport select committee, Conservative Huw Merriman, describing it as "the equivalent of putting a gun to someone's head".
Despite significant tensions between the two sides, the pilots' union Balpa has since managed to reach an agreement with BA, which reduced the number of possible redundancies in exchange for significant concessions on pay.
But relations between the company and unions representing other staff - Unite and GMB - have been considerably more strained. No deal has yet been done, and BA has pushed forward with its plans.
Those plans have major implications for BA's cabin crew.
The company currently has different crew divisions, or 'fleets', which operate as separate units with their own terms and conditions.
It wants to create a single organisation, and put all crew on the same type of contract.
For lower paid staff, principally those who have joined the company since 2010, this would mean a modest salary increase.
For longer serving crew, who are well-paid by industry standards, it would mean a cut in basic salary of 20%. But because they will also lose other allowances, many say they will see their overall take-home wages drop by 40% to 50%.
Executives insist such changes are necessary, in the face of what IAG's chief executive Willie Walsh described last week as the biggest crisis the airline has ever faced.
Mr Walsh told the BBC: "Anyone who believes that this is just a temporary downturn and therefore can be fixed with temporary measures, I'm afraid seriously misjudges what the industry is going through."
But many employees believe the company is deliberately exploiting the immediate crisis to justify pushing through far-reaching, irreversible changes.
"I really love my job", says Vicky
"I'm just really upset with how things have planned out. I think it's a permanent solution to a temporary problem. Yet our managers are only taking temporary pay cuts."
Staff elsewhere in British Airways are also affected by the changes, with the threat of compulsory redundancy hanging over them and the prospect of steep pay cuts ahead.
John - again, not his real name - is an engineer who helps maintain BA's long-haul aircraft at Heathrow.
He wants to stay in his job, because he is worried his qualifications would not be recognised in other industries and he would struggle to find an employer willing to take him on.
"Let's be realistic", he says, "No-one is going to take someone in their 50s and train them up when they can get a 20-something instead. It's not going to happen."
John says many of his colleagues are in a similar position - and the worry is proving an unwelcome distraction at work.
"I've been walking around checking an aircraft prior to departure, and I find I can't remember what I've been looking at - so I have to do it again", he says.
"I can't see how you can be expected to work like that. But this process is being driven by accountants, and they can't see further than their noses".
Like many other BA staff I have spoken to, John believes the company's response to the crisis has proved catastrophic for morale - at a company once widely admired for the fierce loyalty and enthusiasm of its staff.
"I think this will do the airline a lot of harm" he says. "I can't see how they get out of it".
Although BA is still in talks with unions, relations are far from cordial.
Last week the general secretary of Unite, Len McCluskey described the company's strategy as "despicable", and said the union was working towards industrial action with immediate effect.
But the airline insists it has no option.
"Our half year results clearly show the enormous financial impact of Covid-19 on our business," said a spokesperson. "We are having to make difficult decisions and take every possible action now to protect as many jobs as possible."
"And, while we never could have anticipated being in a position of making redundancies, over 6,000 of our colleagues have now indicated that they wish to take voluntary redundancy from BA."

 

vipero

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British Airways Union Standoff. Could It Be A Fight To The Death?

Have unions made the correct judgement?

BA’s pilots union BALPA has assessed the seriousness of the situation and has engaged in a tough negotiation to mitigate the fall out for its members.

I’m a believer in balanced industrial relations but I really think there have been some enormous missed opportunities for valuable negotiation on behalf of BA’s other worker groups. Regrettably much time has been lost and for some of these employees it is now too late.

The "BA Betrayal" campaign could lead to the loss of future business and calls by unions to take slots away from the airline really would be a further nail in the coffin. On top of this, industrial action is now proposed. I don’t see any other airline waiting in the wings who could credibly take up services vacated by BA or providing work on similar terms to any displaced employees. It all looks more like a fight to the death rather than a strategy to engage, to thrash out an agreement and to protect the livelihoods of so many employees.

 

speedbird100

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trovo i sindacati inglesi di una inutilita' sconcertante (GMB e Unite nello specifico).
comunque BALPA ha raggiunto un accordo con BA, dal messaggio precedente sembra che sia il sindacato che sta lottando con BA quando i piloti hanno gia' risolto tutto.
 
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vipero

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trovo i sindacati inglesi di una inutilita' sconcertante (GMB e Unite nello specifico).
comunque BALPA ha raggiunto un accordo con BA, dal messaggio precedente sembra che sia il sindacato che sta lottando con BA quando i piloti hanno gia' risolto tutto.
In realtà l'articolo apprezza appunto la negoziazione svolta da BALPA, contro il muso duro di Unite.
 

13900

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trovo i sindacati inglesi di una inutilita' sconcertante (GMB e Unite nello specifico).
comunque BALPA ha raggiunto un accordo con BA, dal messaggio precedente sembra che sia il sindacato che sta lottando con BA quando i piloti hanno gia' risolto tutto.
Avendo fatto due re-org (riapplica per il tuo lavoro, taglio del 30% del personale) in 9 anni in BA... concordo. GMB in particolare. Unite, poi, s'è giocata Mixed Fleet stavolta.
 

limoncello 74

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intanto ieri il primo dei 747 fermi dopo il blocco covid è partito alla volta della spagna

Boeing 747​
-436​
27349​
1048​
G-CIVD​
British Airways​
ferried 18aug20 LHR-CDT, for part-out & scrap​
 
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limoncello 74

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Boeing 747​
-436​
25824​
1200​
G-BYGF​
British Airways​
ferried 26aug20 LHR-EGBP, for part-out & scrap​
 

limoncello 74

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Boeing 777​
-236​
27106​
10​
G-ZZZB​
British Airways​
ferried 29aug20 LHR-DGX, for part-out & scrap​
 

TW 843

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Leggo sopra i vari aeroporti dove andranno a morire smantellati i WB BA e mi permetto una veloce disgressione: coi cimiteri di aerei si fanno soldi.
Senza nemmeno allargare il concetto allo storage che rende alle varie tarmacaerosave cifre stratosferiche giornaliere in cambio di? Di zero virgolaniente. Li guardi e incassi. Punto.
Dicevo dei cimiteri. Una decina in UK, poi Francia, Spagna, Portogallo, germania, Olanda, Slovacchia, romania e via dicendo.
In Italia no. Non sia mai. Ci mancherebbe.
Ci sono sempre più aerei da smantellare e sempre meno posto dove accantonarli.
Fossi la Catullo , Cuneo, Forlì, Taranto, andrei col cappello in mano alla Tarmac a coprirli d ‘ oro pur che aprano una facility (che pagheremo tutta noi) sul mio aeroporto.
Fine OT
 

ermide

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Veneto.
Leggo sopra i vari aeroporti dove andranno a morire smantellati i WB BA e mi permetto una veloce disgressione: coi cimiteri di aerei si fanno soldi.
Senza nemmeno allargare il concetto allo storage che rende alle varie tarmacaerosave cifre stratosferiche giornaliere in cambio di? Di zero virgolaniente. Li guardi e incassi. Punto.
Dicevo dei cimiteri. Una decina in UK, poi Francia, Spagna, Portogallo, germania, Olanda, Slovacchia, romania e via dicendo.
In Italia no. Non sia mai. Ci mancherebbe.
Ci sono sempre più aerei da smantellare e sempre meno posto dove accantonarli.
Fossi la Catullo , Cuneo, Forlì, Taranto, andrei col cappello in mano alla Tarmac a coprirli d ‘ oro pur che aprano una facility (che pagheremo tutta noi) sul mio aeroporto.
Fine OT
Le autorizzazioni allo stoccaggio di rifiuti speciali le domandi tu? Sai che per averle occorrono anni?
 

TW 843

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Le autorizzazioni allo stoccaggio di rifiuti speciali le domandi tu? Sai che per averle occorrono anni?
Mi scusi, non avevo visto che stava ronfando era in smart working sul divano.
Vado in Austria o in Slovenia a vedere se magari da loro il concetto di lavorare per vivere non è sterminato a colpi di sussidi come da noi.
Buon riposo Pornhub.
 
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