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  1. #51

    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Se le immagini sono corrette (cioè se si riferiscono veramente a questo incidente), l'aereo sembrerebbe in fiamme prima dell'impatto
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qY-5_c6fjlg

  2. #52

    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    R.I.P.


    Inviato dal mio iPhone utilizzando Tapatalk

  3. #53
    Socio 2015
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    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Se le immagini che girano fossero confermate, e' davvero un'incidente terribile.

  4. #54

    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Quote Originariamente inviato da Nonno Salt Visualizza il messaggio
    Se le immagini sono corrette (cioè se si riferiscono veramente a questo incidente), l'aereo sembrerebbe in fiamme prima dell'impatto
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qY-5_c6fjlg
    Da questa inquadratura non risulta alcun incendio prima dell'impatto.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfuA...ature=youtu.be

  5. #55

    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    fonte :ttps://twitter.com/AirCrashMayday
    Voice e data recorders ritrovati gravemente danneggiatiClicca sull'immagine per ingrandirla. 

Nome:   CeAOpJKWoAAPSd1.jpg 
Visite: 139 
Dimensione: 40.7 KB 
ID: 8381

  6. #56
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    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    agghiacciante...
    RIP alle vittime...

  7. #57

    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Quote Originariamente inviato da Shogun Visualizza il messaggio
    Da questa inquadratura non risulta alcun incendio prima dell'impatto.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfuA...ature=youtu.be
    Si, vero. Evidentemente nei precedenti video le luci diffuse dalla foschia e probabilmente riprese all'infrarosso, traevano in inganno. Qui si vede chiaramente invece

  8. #58
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    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Quote Originariamente inviato da Nonno Salt Visualizza il messaggio
    Si, vero. Evidentemente nei precedenti video le luci diffuse dalla foschia e probabilmente riprese all'infrarosso, traevano in inganno. Qui si vede chiaramente invece
    😱

  9. #59
    Junior Member L'avatar di Mattiaviation
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    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Posted at 2230GMT 20MAR16

    flydubai on Sunday 20MAR16 has revised its operational flight numbers for Dubai – Rostov-on-Don service, followed by the incident on 19MAR16. The airline has retired flight number FZ981/982, and will be replaced by FZ935/936 from 22MAR16.
    FZ935 DXB2145 – 0120+1ROV 73H 25
    FZ936 ROV0220 – 0730DXB 73H 36
    MtAv

  10. #60
    Member L'avatar di AlexSer
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    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    immagini scioccanti
    RIP

  11. #61

    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Aereo Fly Dubai caduto in Russia, la simulazione del disastro

    http://video.corriere.it/aereo-fly-d...id=SF020103COR

  12. #62

    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don


  13. #63

    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Quote Originariamente inviato da I-AIGH Visualizza il messaggio
    Si sapeva, ma fino a quando non succede qualcosa di brutto "you are just primadonnas"

    O vogliamo parlare anche di questo?

    The following may or may not have helped to inspire AAR to conduct the upcoming meeting. At least it may serve as some food for thought. Earlier this year the report below was filed and acknowledged by EASA and the FAA. The report was also shared with the Office of HH Sheikh Mohammed with the explanation that EK’s pilot shortage is not due to global factors but home made. From there it was delivered to the GCAA. As far as I know the FAA is actively investigating.


    “…as a former Emirates pilot I want to report the lack of regulatory oversight and effective labour laws in the UAE. Emirates operates its long-haul fleet with unprecedented "crew productivity" at a crew factor near 7. That is impossible to match for any major Western airline. The issue reported in the WSJ on April 9, 2015 is still not rectified. This is a ticking time-bomb for flight safety and crew health. I highly recommend that you require a rolling 12 month duty record for any Emirates crew member operating in your jurisdiction, covering flight, simulator and ground duties as well as deadheading. The UAE can not be trusted to safely regulate aviation.

    The main takeaway of the following detailed information is:

    • Emirates are deliberately recording false check-in times for all of their pilots on all flights. Because any duty limit or rest calculation is based on check-in time it is simply impossible to say whether an Emirates crew is operating legally or not. This is not just a problem for individual flights but also has knock-on effects on the following required rest periods, next allowed check-in time and duty totals.

    • When the fact was made public the GCAA as regulatory authority promised to regulate it properly. The opposite happened. They covered this up for Emirates because they are by no means independent. Western authorities shouldn’t trust them blindly to regulate Emirates. Please see the U.S. State Department’s Human Rights Report for 2014 to understand that independent control of a government-owned business is impossible under their legal system. The Chairman of Emirates Airline, Sheikh Ahmed, leads the Dubai Civil Aviation Authority but more importantly he sits on the Board of Directors for the GCAA as a Board Member (see GCAA website).

    • Emirates are also using other shortcuts and bullying of their employees to make their pilots operate at an unhealthy workload level. On 03 June 2015 Emirates Captain Jim Jacobs (54) died from a heart attack at JFK when boarding the flight to Dubai. He was exhausted and wanted to retire that year.

    • As a result of these illegal practices Emirates are achieving great savings by operating at a crew factor of 7 where flight safety dictates a crew factor of 11 in similar operations at regulated Western Airlines (e.g. AirFrance A380 fleet). Emirates presently operates about 250 aircraft (number from open sources) with about 3,850 pilots (from EK seniority list as of 12-2015), some of whom are in training, in management or on sick leave.


    1 False Check-in Times

    Every Emirates pilot is forced to report for duty significantly prior to the legally registered reporting time. In other words: Emirates is extending their pilots’ flight duty times by registering false reporting times for each and every flight.
    Pilots’ flight time limitations are obviously safety relevant and in the case of Emirates Airline the operations manual is approved by the General Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) in the United Arab Emirates. According to the Emirates Operations Manual the Standard Reporting Time for pilots is 1 hour before a flight. So a pilot is legally required to report for duty only 1 hour before the flight departs.
    But the operational reality is very different. Emirates pilots are picked up at their residences by a company chauffeur and arrive at the Emirates HQ at least 1 hour and 45 minutes before departure. The timing of the company transport is set by Emirates and can not be delayed by the pilot. The pilot will then proceed through Passport Control and Customs and he will check in his baggage. He will then conduct a preflight briefing with the other pilot on his flight. The flight crew briefing ends at 1 hour 25 minutes before departure as documented in the Flight Crew Departure Timeline. After that the pilots will join their cabin crew and proceed to the aircraft.
    So the pilot has completed all of the outlined tasks at 1 hour and 25 minutes before the flight and yet his reporting time is registered at only 1 hour before the flight. Why doesn’t Emirates adjust the Standard Reporting Time? Even Emirates Cabin Crews’ Standard Reporting Time is set at 1 hour and 30 minutes but Cabin Crew Flight Time Limitations are less limiting than those for pilots.
    I am attaching a sample Flight Crew Departure Timeline (Part of the Briefing Pack). It is an example of a 2 Pilot Crew Turnaround. EK 544 and EK 545 Dubai-Chennai-Dubai. B773, A6-EMR on April 25th 2014.

    Pickup by Company Car 00:30 Dubai Local Time
    Flight Crew Briefing End 01:20 Dubai Local Time
    Reporting Time 01:45 Dubai Local Time
    Scheduled Departure 02:45 Dubai Local Time
    Actual Departure DXB 02:57 Dubai Local Time
    Actual Arrival MAA 06:37 Dubai Local Time
    Actual Departure MAA 08:02 Dubai Local Time
    Actual Arrival DXB 12:06 Dubai Local Time
    Scheduled Arrival DXB 12:30 Dubai Local Time

    After the WSJ reported this issue on April 9, 2015 Emirates removed the internal document “Flight Crew Departure Time” from the process. But that’s the only change.
    “The GCAA’s Mr. Al Balooshi said reporting requirements for duty time should be “black and white” and begin when a pilot is expected to report for work and finish when his or her last flight taxies into the gate. Emirates said it abides by state-approved flight-time limitations. “(WSJ article).
    This is clearly not the case. Please see the following evidence:

    Attachment 1: Flight Crew Departure Timeline for EK544 on 25 April 2014

    Attachment 2: Pilot Transport Pickup Schedule

    Attachment 3: Internal Memo ‘The Waves’ Flight Crew responsibilities page 6

    Attachment 4: Signage at the Crew Terminal outlining that the combined Pilot & Cabin Crew briefing finishes at Standard Departure Time minus 80 (20 minutes before the pilots’ legally registered check-in time).

    Attachment 5: EK Pilot Recruitment Video @5:00 runtime. Quote: "I get picked up 2 hours 30 minutes before departure.” http://youtu.be/A53VRz_KhnY

    Attachment 6: Emirates OM-A Section 7

    Attachment 7: Wall Street Journal Article, April 9, 2015

    Attachment 8: Internal email by the Manager Regulatory Affairs telling the related parties in Emirates to remove the Flight Crew Departure Timeline document from the briefing pack, 22 April 2015


    2. Further Issues

    Here are some of the other issues that I can also back up with evidence and further witnesses:

    • Pilots are bullied not to report sick. They receive warning letters if their annual sick days go above a fairly low threshold and may not receive the annual bonus. The first thing is usually to withdraw the right for self-certification of sickness, meaning you can’t call in sick for a single day without a doctor’s certification (not very practical giving the nightly duty schedules).
    • the process for reporting sick fatigue is a lot more complicated than just calling sick.
    • the Emirates Clinic is overcrowded and understaffed with doctors. Long waiting times are the result.
    • the process for cabin crew to report sick is completely prohibitive now. They must drag themselves to EK HQ at any time of the day or night where they only get the sick note but no treatment.
    • there is no proper East-West time-zone curfew applied to the rosters
    • on Ultra-Long-Haul flights there is now a factoring for 'stick time', meaning you only get half the credit for a flight if you are on the augmenting crew that didn’t do the take-off and landing. This has implications for the following rest times etc.
    • No credit for time in a certified full-flight simulator. That’s another 22hours of flight duty per year that just disappear from the records.
    • No proper leave allocation. Out of 42 contractual leave days only 30 days are

    Facile fare successo e battere la concorrenza così, con petrodollari no limits a sistemare qualsiasi problema, e col controllo totale dello stato e delle autorità.
    Per quanto non abbia un buon occhio di riguardo per i sindacati, e quelli italiani in particolar modo, voglio far notare che le conseguenze dei "desicandalizzati" sono queste.

  14. #64
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    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Scusate ma come può essere che sia caduto cosi in picchiata ?
    Possibile che una picchiata cosi veloce sia causata da mal tempo ?

  15. #65
    Amministratore L'avatar di kenyaprince
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    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Quote Originariamente inviato da F-GREG Visualizza il messaggio
    Si sapeva, ma fino a quando non succede qualcosa di brutto "you are just primadonnas"

    O vogliamo parlare anche di questo?

    The following may or may not have helped to inspire AAR to conduct the upcoming meeting. At least it may serve as some food for thought. Earlier this year the report below was filed and acknowledged by EASA and the FAA. The report was also shared with the Office of HH Sheikh Mohammed with the explanation that EK’s pilot shortage is not due to global factors but home made. From there it was delivered to the GCAA. As far as I know the FAA is actively investigating.


    “…as a former Emirates pilot I want to report the lack of regulatory oversight and effective labour laws in the UAE. Emirates operates its long-haul fleet with unprecedented "crew productivity" at a crew factor near 7. That is impossible to match for any major Western airline. The issue reported in the WSJ on April 9, 2015 is still not rectified. This is a ticking time-bomb for flight safety and crew health. I highly recommend that you require a rolling 12 month duty record for any Emirates crew member operating in your jurisdiction, covering flight, simulator and ground duties as well as deadheading. The UAE can not be trusted to safely regulate aviation.

    The main takeaway of the following detailed information is:

    • Emirates are deliberately recording false check-in times for all of their pilots on all flights. Because any duty limit or rest calculation is based on check-in time it is simply impossible to say whether an Emirates crew is operating legally or not. This is not just a problem for individual flights but also has knock-on effects on the following required rest periods, next allowed check-in time and duty totals.

    • When the fact was made public the GCAA as regulatory authority promised to regulate it properly. The opposite happened. They covered this up for Emirates because they are by no means independent. Western authorities shouldn’t trust them blindly to regulate Emirates. Please see the U.S. State Department’s Human Rights Report for 2014 to understand that independent control of a government-owned business is impossible under their legal system. The Chairman of Emirates Airline, Sheikh Ahmed, leads the Dubai Civil Aviation Authority but more importantly he sits on the Board of Directors for the GCAA as a Board Member (see GCAA website).

    • Emirates are also using other shortcuts and bullying of their employees to make their pilots operate at an unhealthy workload level. On 03 June 2015 Emirates Captain Jim Jacobs (54) died from a heart attack at JFK when boarding the flight to Dubai. He was exhausted and wanted to retire that year.

    • As a result of these illegal practices Emirates are achieving great savings by operating at a crew factor of 7 where flight safety dictates a crew factor of 11 in similar operations at regulated Western Airlines (e.g. AirFrance A380 fleet). Emirates presently operates about 250 aircraft (number from open sources) with about 3,850 pilots (from EK seniority list as of 12-2015), some of whom are in training, in management or on sick leave.


    1 False Check-in Times

    Every Emirates pilot is forced to report for duty significantly prior to the legally registered reporting time. In other words: Emirates is extending their pilots’ flight duty times by registering false reporting times for each and every flight.
    Pilots’ flight time limitations are obviously safety relevant and in the case of Emirates Airline the operations manual is approved by the General Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) in the United Arab Emirates. According to the Emirates Operations Manual the Standard Reporting Time for pilots is 1 hour before a flight. So a pilot is legally required to report for duty only 1 hour before the flight departs.
    But the operational reality is very different. Emirates pilots are picked up at their residences by a company chauffeur and arrive at the Emirates HQ at least 1 hour and 45 minutes before departure. The timing of the company transport is set by Emirates and can not be delayed by the pilot. The pilot will then proceed through Passport Control and Customs and he will check in his baggage. He will then conduct a preflight briefing with the other pilot on his flight. The flight crew briefing ends at 1 hour 25 minutes before departure as documented in the Flight Crew Departure Timeline. After that the pilots will join their cabin crew and proceed to the aircraft.
    So the pilot has completed all of the outlined tasks at 1 hour and 25 minutes before the flight and yet his reporting time is registered at only 1 hour before the flight. Why doesn’t Emirates adjust the Standard Reporting Time? Even Emirates Cabin Crews’ Standard Reporting Time is set at 1 hour and 30 minutes but Cabin Crew Flight Time Limitations are less limiting than those for pilots.
    I am attaching a sample Flight Crew Departure Timeline (Part of the Briefing Pack). It is an example of a 2 Pilot Crew Turnaround. EK 544 and EK 545 Dubai-Chennai-Dubai. B773, A6-EMR on April 25th 2014.

    Pickup by Company Car 00:30 Dubai Local Time
    Flight Crew Briefing End 01:20 Dubai Local Time
    Reporting Time 01:45 Dubai Local Time
    Scheduled Departure 02:45 Dubai Local Time
    Actual Departure DXB 02:57 Dubai Local Time
    Actual Arrival MAA 06:37 Dubai Local Time
    Actual Departure MAA 08:02 Dubai Local Time
    Actual Arrival DXB 12:06 Dubai Local Time
    Scheduled Arrival DXB 12:30 Dubai Local Time

    After the WSJ reported this issue on April 9, 2015 Emirates removed the internal document “Flight Crew Departure Time” from the process. But that’s the only change.
    “The GCAA’s Mr. Al Balooshi said reporting requirements for duty time should be “black and white” and begin when a pilot is expected to report for work and finish when his or her last flight taxies into the gate. Emirates said it abides by state-approved flight-time limitations. “(WSJ article).
    This is clearly not the case. Please see the following evidence:

    Attachment 1: Flight Crew Departure Timeline for EK544 on 25 April 2014

    Attachment 2: Pilot Transport Pickup Schedule

    Attachment 3: Internal Memo ‘The Waves’ Flight Crew responsibilities page 6

    Attachment 4: Signage at the Crew Terminal outlining that the combined Pilot & Cabin Crew briefing finishes at Standard Departure Time minus 80 (20 minutes before the pilots’ legally registered check-in time).

    Attachment 5: EK Pilot Recruitment Video @5:00 runtime. Quote: "I get picked up 2 hours 30 minutes before departure.” http://youtu.be/A53VRz_KhnY

    Attachment 6: Emirates OM-A Section 7

    Attachment 7: Wall Street Journal Article, April 9, 2015

    Attachment 8: Internal email by the Manager Regulatory Affairs telling the related parties in Emirates to remove the Flight Crew Departure Timeline document from the briefing pack, 22 April 2015


    2. Further Issues

    Here are some of the other issues that I can also back up with evidence and further witnesses:

    • Pilots are bullied not to report sick. They receive warning letters if their annual sick days go above a fairly low threshold and may not receive the annual bonus. The first thing is usually to withdraw the right for self-certification of sickness, meaning you can’t call in sick for a single day without a doctor’s certification (not very practical giving the nightly duty schedules).
    • the process for reporting sick fatigue is a lot more complicated than just calling sick.
    • the Emirates Clinic is overcrowded and understaffed with doctors. Long waiting times are the result.
    • the process for cabin crew to report sick is completely prohibitive now. They must drag themselves to EK HQ at any time of the day or night where they only get the sick note but no treatment.
    • there is no proper East-West time-zone curfew applied to the rosters
    • on Ultra-Long-Haul flights there is now a factoring for 'stick time', meaning you only get half the credit for a flight if you are on the augmenting crew that didn’t do the take-off and landing. This has implications for the following rest times etc.
    • No credit for time in a certified full-flight simulator. That’s another 22hours of flight duty per year that just disappear from the records.
    • No proper leave allocation. Out of 42 contractual leave days only 30 days are

    Facile fare successo e battere la concorrenza così, con petrodollari no limits a sistemare qualsiasi problema, e col controllo totale dello stato e delle autorità.
    Per quanto non abbia un buon occhio di riguardo per i sindacati, e quelli italiani in particolar modo, voglio far notare che le conseguenze dei "desicandalizzati" sono queste.

    GREG puoi citare la fonte del tuo post ?

  16. #66

    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    La fonte per me è affidabile, ma se non lo è sufficientemente per te lo capisco, ti scrivo in pvt perchè non sono sicuro di poterlo scrivere qui

  17. #67
    Amministratore L'avatar di kenyaprince
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    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    si, l'argomento potrebbe essere molto interessante, volevamo capire il grado di attendibilità della fonte .

  18. #68

    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    il roster del FO è abbastanza interessante :

    10 marzo 6.30 23. 40 vari settori DXB DMM DXB (presumibilmente sei a casa non prima delle 2)
    11 marzo on call dalle 6 alle 13 (non dorme praticamente fino al pomeriggio)
    12 marzo 9.40 18 DXB TIF DXB (giornata average)
    13 marzo 13.55 00.00 vari settori DXB MCT DXB (presumibilmente non sei a casa prima delle 2)
    14 marzo 13.50 22.20 DXB DMM DXB (presumibilmente non sei a casa prima delle 24)
    15 marzo off
    16 marzo 15.55 23.00 DXB MHD DXB (presumibilmente non sei a casa prima delle 24)
    17 marzo 14.30 23. 15 DXB TUU DXB (presumibilmente non sei a casa prima dell'1)
    18 marzo 20.45 to Rostov

    Significa che il tuo corpo è abituato ad andare a dormire intorno alle 3/4 del mattino, più o meno l'ora in cui è avvenuto l'incidente.

  19. #69
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    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    A naso, turni da 9/10 ore di media, incastrati in modo che, da profano, mi pare discutibile, non so quanto siano lunghe le rotazioni (la MCT immagino sia breve, le altre non so), e con una sola giornata intera di riposo in 11 giorni. Quali sono i limiti operativi imposti (o suggeriti) dalle normative?


  20. #70
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    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Quote Originariamente inviato da Dancrane Visualizza il messaggio
    A naso, turni da 9/10 ore di media, incastrati in modo che, da profano, mi pare discutibile, non so quanto siano lunghe le rotazioni (la MCT immagino sia breve, le altre non so), e con una sola giornata intera di riposo in 11 giorni. Quali sono i limiti operativi imposti (o suggeriti) dalle normative?
    In Italia 36 ore di rest ogni 168 ore incluse 2 notti locali, poi dipende dalle rotazioni precedenti, fusi orari, ore di servizio ecc ecc.
    Ultima modifica di 1930; 22nd March 2016 a 22: 52 Motivo: completato frase

  21. #71
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    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Quote Originariamente inviato da 1930 Visualizza il messaggio
    In Italia 36 ore di rest ogni 168 ore incluse 2 notti locali, poi dipende dalle rotazioni precedenti, fusi orari, ore di servizio ecc ecc.
    Grazie. Credo sia utile per tutti poterlo spiegare con un esempio pratico, magari chiarendo le differenze col roster del FO di Flydubai, giusto per capire le differenze

  22. #72

    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Quote Originariamente inviato da Dancrane Visualizza il messaggio
    Grazie. Credo sia utile per tutti poterlo spiegare con un esempio pratico, magari chiarendo le differenze col roster del FO di Flydubai, giusto per capire le differenze
    Mi associo alla richiesta.
    Un moteur d'auto dans le ventre et un d'avion dans le coeur

  23. #73
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    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Quote Originariamente inviato da speedbird001 Visualizza il messaggio
    il roster del FO è abbastanza interessante :

    10 marzo 6.30 23. 40 vari settori DXB DMM DXB (presumibilmente sei a casa non prima delle 2)
    11 marzo on call dalle 6 alle 13 (non dorme praticamente fino al pomeriggio)
    12 marzo 9.40 18 DXB TIF DXB (giornata average)
    13 marzo 13.55 00.00 vari settori DXB MCT DXB (presumibilmente non sei a casa prima delle 2)
    14 marzo 13.50 22.20 DXB DMM DXB (presumibilmente non sei a casa prima delle 24)
    15 marzo off
    16 marzo 15.55 23.00 DXB MHD DXB (presumibilmente non sei a casa prima delle 24)
    17 marzo 14.30 23. 15 DXB TUU DXB (presumibilmente non sei a casa prima dell'1)
    18 marzo 20.45 to Rostov

    Significa che il tuo corpo è abituato ad andare a dormire intorno alle 3/4 del mattino, più o meno l'ora in cui è avvenuto l'incidente.
    È normale un turno dalle 6.30 alle 23.40, oppure è un refuso? Sono più di 17 ore di lavoro.

    DaV
    https://possiamopartireadesso.wordpress.com/

    Why don't you ask the kids at Tienanmen square?
    Was fashion the reason why they were there?

  24. #74
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    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Quote Originariamente inviato da Dancrane Visualizza il messaggio
    Grazie. Credo sia utile per tutti poterlo spiegare con un esempio pratico, magari chiarendo le differenze col roster del FO di Flydubai, giusto per capire le differenze
    Dalla foto del turno riesco a capire poco degli orari schedulati, soprattutto se sono in orari locali, UTC o locali all'aeroporto dove si è basati (aims permette di impostarli tutti e tre), ma per fare un esempio, prendendo in considerazione che il 29 febbraio il primo ufficiale fosse in rest e che gli orari sono locali della base di appartenenza (quindi abbia fatto almeno 36 ore senza impieghi di alcun genere e con 2 notti locali), dal 1 al 5 ha effettuato 5 giorni di impiego, poi ha avuto un riposo con una notte locale e meno di 36 ore, quindi non si può considerare rest, tale rest lo effettuerà alla fine delle 168 ore ovvero l'8, ha due off, quindi più di 36 ore e 2 notti locali (notte locale significa un periodo di 8 ore che va dalle 22 alle 8)...fatto questo esempio a me sembra, a grandi linee ovviamente, che a livello normativo (sempre che gli UAE seguano le regole FTL EASA, ma non credo) il primo ufficiale fosse in regola, ha un rest l'8, uno il 15, un altro il 21, un altro ancora il 24.

    Per chi fa medio e corto raggio è abbastanza normale avere rotazioni di 5 giorni on e 2 off...esistono inoltre anche altre regole aggiuntive nelle FTL, come i disruptive schedules, ovvero gli orari irregolari, che prendono in considerazione le partenze al mattino presto, le partenze di sera tardi e i periodi di servizio notturni, questi possono essere programmati per massimo 4 giorni di fila.

  25. #75
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    Predefinito Re: Boeing 737-800 FlyDubai precipita vicino Rostov-on-Don

    Quote Originariamente inviato da I-DAVE Visualizza il messaggio
    È normale un turno dalle 6.30 alle 23.40, oppure è un refuso? Sono più di 17 ore di lavoro.

    DaV
    Mi pare di leggere 11 non 23.



    Comunque nel caso in cui fosse possibile riposare a bordo, in appositi crew rest, con piloti di rinforzo (per fare 17 ore di flight duty period devono essere due in più del minimo e massimo 2 tratte) è possibile.

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